Difference between revisions of "Instrument recall"

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|Gittern||String||  || The gittern is shaped much in the manner of an elongated teardrop with a flat-faced, curving belly and a long, gently bending fretted neck. A set of twelve strings courses over a short bridge and decorative sound hole to a curving peg-box carved with an elaborate scroll.  
 
|Gittern||String||  || The gittern is shaped much in the manner of an elongated teardrop with a flat-faced, curving belly and a long, gently bending fretted neck. A set of twelve strings courses over a short bridge and decorative sound hole to a curving peg-box carved with an elaborate scroll.  
 
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|Gremlik Magkwon||Wind||Dwarven|| A semi-conical valved brass instrument, the Gremlik Magkwon is almost always made of metal. The instrument should be worn over the shoulder when played, and features a large bell that situates above the tubist's head, projecting forward. The three piston valves are located directly in front of the musician slightly above waist-height. A gooseneck holds the mouthpiece, allowing for finer adjustment. The instrument is named Gremlik Magkwon or "Angry Mother-in-Law" due to the deep tonal pitch that the instrument provides, and for its historical use in Dwarven culture as a warning horn during battle.|-
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|Gremlik Magkwon||Wind||Dwarven|| A semi-conical valved brass instrument, the Gremlik Magkwon is almost always made of metal. The instrument should be worn over the shoulder when played, and features a large bell that situates above the tubist's head, projecting forward. The three piston valves are located directly in front of the musician slightly above waist-height. A gooseneck holds the mouthpiece, allowing for finer adjustment. The instrument is named Gremlik Magkwon or "Angry Mother-in-Law" due to the deep tonal pitch that the instrument provides, and for its historical use in Dwarven culture as a warning horn during battle.
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|Guiro||Percussion || || The guiro is a wooden friction instrument generally carved to resemble a gourd with a series of ridges along one side. A scraping stick attached to the guiro by a leather cord produces the distinctive clacking sound by rubbing it across the ridges.  
 
|Guiro||Percussion || || The guiro is a wooden friction instrument generally carved to resemble a gourd with a series of ridges along one side. A scraping stick attached to the guiro by a leather cord produces the distinctive clacking sound by rubbing it across the ridges.  
 
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Latest revision as of 11:36, 19 January 2019

Instrument Type Racial Association Recall
Angle Harp String The harp is a form of very simple harp formed of a hollow resonator and a single, obtusely curving arm that sports a small array of strings. It is normally played by holding the resonator against the body or ground while the strings are plucked.
Bagpipes Wind Bagpipes generally consist of a set of drones attached to an inflatable bag. A blowpipe is used to inflate the bag, which in turn is used to force a steady stream of air through the drones. Another pipe, often called a chanter or melody pipe, is used to play the melody.
Crumhorn String Gor'Tog With a three-sided body, the balalaika is often considered a quintessential Toggish instrument as it can be considered unwieldy. While Togs themselves introduced the low resonating bass and contrabass balalaika to society, which could explain why other races found this instrument hard to manage -- other pitches have been adapted and intermingled into Elanthia culture including a piccolo, popular among gnomes. The balalaika in Toggish culture was often made use of during festive occasions because of the lively tones it can produce. A balalaika requires a pick or plectrum to play.
Bandoura String
Banjo String The banjo is four or five stringed instrument consisting of a wooden or metal rim with a drumskin stretched across it. A neck is mounted on the side of the rim, with a bridge between the neck and the tailpiece.
Bass viol String The bass viol, or double bass, is the largest and lowest-pitched bowed string instrument of the viol family. When playing the bass viol, the bassist either stands or sits on a high stool while leaning the instrument against their body with the bass viol turned slightly inwards for more accessibility to the strings. Because of this stance, the body of the bass viol has distinct sloped shoulders.
Bassoon Wind The bassoon is a woodwind instrument that typically plays music in the bass and tenor clefs, and occasionally in the treble. Larger than an oboe, a bassoon consists of the bell, which is the uppermost piece, the bass joint which connects the bell and the boot, which culminates in the bocal that holds the instruments two reed that produce the bassoon's signature low, dark and reedy timbre.
Bird-bone flutes Wind Small bird bones, each one carefully cleaned and hollowed out, have been drilled with an array of holes and strung upon a rawhide thong for wearing around the neck.
Bodhran Percussion The bodhran has a round frame covered with a stretched skin head that is beaten with a tipper when played. A pair of crossbars inside the frame provide a handhold while the player is standing or walking, or rest on the knees when the player is seated.
Bones Percussion The bones are a pair of flat, rectangular-shaped pieces of bone or wood, about an inch wide and long as a hand from base to fingertips. They are meant to be slotted between the fingers of the hand one, two, or three fingers apart, and clapped together by the motion of the wrist.
Bongos Percussion Popularized by shipfarers and pirates as signal communication from long distances, the bongos produce a relatively high-pitched sound compared to other drums. The bongos are meant to be held behind the knees, with the slightly larger drum on the right when the musician is right-handed. While the in the past some signals were conveyed using a hammer, musically the bongos are played by striking the edge of the drumheads with the fingers and palms, and the glissando is caused by rubbing the third finger supported by the thumb across the head of the drum. Bongos are most often made with wood, but can be made with shell or metal.
Box fiddle String
Cane flute Wind The cane flute is a form of end-blown flute that has been drilled with a series of holes down its front. Often crafted from river cane or bamboo, this flute is popular with nomadic and semi-nomadic tribes.
Carnyx Wind The carnyx curves sharply upward, meant to be held high above the head when played. Its end is often crafted to resemble the forward-facing heads of creatures with open, laughing mouths.
Castanets Percussion The castanets are made from pairs of slightly hollowed disks, one set for each hand, that are clapped together. One hand plays the basic beat, while the other hand taps out more intricate rhythms. Their small size makes them a favorite of dancers who can easily play complex beats to enhance their performance.
Celestina Harp String Elves An instrument from Elven culture, the celestina harp is particularly favored by Celestial Elves. Reaching only about waist high to an Elf, with thirty-six metal strings, it has a sloping soundboard with a curved back, a slightly convex pillar. The celestina harp has a bright tone and a resonant quality that carries through the deeper instruments in an orchestra, which has endeared itself to many a musician.
Cello String
Chalumeaux Wind Elves An instrument from Elven culture, the chalumeaux is favored particularly by River Elves. The chalmeaux is a single-reed woodwind instrument, with a cylindrical bore featuring eight tone holes -- seven in front and one in back for the thumb. The mouthpiece is wide by design and the reed is held in place by a metal ring. Chalumeaux are traditionally made of wood, however pieces made entirely of metal are not unknown to the River Elves as they tend to carry sound better over the roar of rushing water.
Cistre String The cistre is a pear-shaped instrument similar to the lute, but fitted with a drone in addition to the normal six courses of strings, giving it a subtly echoing tone when played.
Cittern String The pear-shaped cittern has a flat back and very long, fretted neck ending in a scrollwork pegbox. Often crafted in a variety of shapes, the cittern also often bears an ornamentally carved sound hole placed beneath courses of six strings and a short, shallow bridge placed halfway between the sound hole and the instrument's lower edge.
Clarin Wind
Clarinet Wind The clarinet is a woodwind instrument played with a single reed. The instrument consists of a cylindrical tube that flares out into a modest bell. The upper and lower joint of the clarinet are equipped with numerous tone holes, some of which are left open to be covered by the finger and others which are operated by utilizing metal keys on the instrument. The clarinet is often made of wood, but can also be constructed of other materials. Because of the amount of tone holes and keys on the instrument, ornate work is not usually found on these instruments.
Claves Percussion Claves are a percussion instrument, consisting of a pair of short, thick dowels. Claves are almost always made of wood, typically rosewood, ebony or blackwood. When struck claves produce a bright clicking noise, and are sometimes hollow and carved in the middle to amplify the sound. The usual technique is to hold one lightly with the thumb and fingertips of the non-dominant hand, with the palm up. This forms the hand into a resonating chamber for the clave.
Clay whistle Wind The small clay whistle is crafted from ingeniously shaped clay, pottery, or ceramics often found in fanciful shapes or to resemble creatures. An array of small holes run across the front, allowing one to adjust the tones of the whistle while covering or uncovering them.
Concertina Wind You imagine it's used to play music but otherwise can't seem to recall anything of note.
Conch shell Wind The shell is crafted from a large shell once inhabited by a sea creature. It is played by placing one's fingers upon a variety of small holes in one side and blowing through the end, directing the air through the spiral inside.
Cornemuse Wind Elves An instrument from Elven culture, the cornemuse is favored particularly by Sand Elves and musical historians trace the instrument back to the Sand Elf tribes near Muspar'i. Similar to bagpipes, the cornemuse consists of only a single reed, closed at one end and slotted. The height of the reed can vary for the type of sound range one wishes to convey, although all cornemuses fall into the contra-alto to tenor range. Chanters on this instrument are normally made of bone, but wood is often used, while the bag is almost always traditionally made of leather, although a heavy fabric can be used.
Cornet Wind The cornet is a complex instrument, most often crafted from silver or a copper alloy. It is formed from a long tube that loops back upon itself, leaving a flared mouthpiece ta one end and an even larger flaring bell at the other. Three keys are placed upright through the cornet's center, directing the air flowing through it through different tubes to vary the tones it produces.
Crumhorn Wind Gor'Tog Historically associated by Toggish clans with war or battle, warriors were rallied to arms in the defense of their villages by the low, humming nasal drone of these enclosed double reed instruments with an upward-curving end. Now, the instrument is generally used by clans in rites of age, or when an older warrior passes on -- but each clan still practices and knows their specific war and battle calls.
Cymbals Percussion You imagine it's used to play music but otherwise can't seem to recall anything of note.
Damaru Percussion The damaru are normally crafted from two skulls, lashed together with often decorative cords, and played by beating the top of the skull with each hand. Though in modern times they are more a curiosity for those interested in ritualistic items, they were once commonly used by various barbarian tribes.
Darje Percussion S'Kra Mur The darje has a round frame covered on one side with a drum skin for beating out a rhythm. The frame is also set with several pairs of metal discs, which hang loosely in evenly spaced openings to add a bit of jingle to the instrument's sound. Its size and versatile playing style makes it popular with dancers and gypsies.
Didjeridu Wind The didjeridu is a long wood or bamboo horn with a separate mouthpiece generally sealed on by wax. Usually made of termite-hollowed ironwood or gumwood, the didjeridu produces a deep, resonating tone.
Doumbec Percussion The doumbec is a small, hour-glass shaped drum found most commonly in barbarian cultures. Its top side is fitted with the hide of a local creature, held in place either with sharp metal pegs or lengths of rawhide.
Drum Percussion
Dulcimer String Elves An instrument from Elven culture, the frost dulcimer is favored particularly by Snow Elves. The frost dulcimer is typically strung with three to four strings, and the body of the instrument can be designed in several arrays, hourglass being the most popular, but teardrop and trapezoidal being highly favored as well. The frost dulcimer is generally played across the lap, with the right hand manipulating the strings, while fretting with the left. Frost dulcimers are always made of wood, but can be elaborately decorated with carving or other adornments.
Elkabongador String Gor'Tog The Elkabongador is a large viol-shaped instrument with a lead bottom and a heavy oaken neck. Traditionally, a Gor'Tog troubador would strum it while courting his lady love, and when, invariably, someone would complain at the din, he'd use it to bash the music critic into senselessness and continue his serenade.
Faenellica String Elves The faenellica is stringed instrument of Elven design. It has a long neck and a delicate pear-shaped body, with four strings that run down its length, stopping just after the sound hole. The neck is topped with a small pegboard, one knob for each string, to aid the tuning process.
Fiddle String The fiddle is a simpler version of the stringed violin, often crafted in fanciful shapes and sizes depending upon what region it is found. It has a flat back and short, unfretted neck that supports a set of four strings secured at one end by an elaborate pegbox. Using a bow, this instrument may be either held against the shoulder or in the lap to be played.
Fife Wind The silver fife is a simplistic form of side-blown flute most often crafted from wood or metal. A large blow hole sits at one capped end while a series of six holes grace the upper edge of the far end, allowing one to vary the tones of the instrument by covering or uncovering them.
Flute Wind The flute is a slender wind instrument commonly crafted from a variety of materials. Formed from a straight tube easily as long as a grown Halfling's arm, the flute has a small blow hole at its capped end and an array of smaller finger holes gracing its other end. A simplistic network of four keys covers the two holes closest to the open end, allowing the player more control than would be available with the flute's more rustic cousin, the fife.
Frottoir Percussion Generally carved from hard wood with corrugated tin or copper covering the front, the frottoir produces its distinctive sound when sticks are scraped along the ridges. The instrument is shaped so that it can be worn and played on the chest.
Gansa-gambang Percussion The gansa-gambang is a large example of a metallophone that bears no less than seven curving metal bars placed upon a cradle-shaped body. Gansa-gambang's are often ornamentally carved to resemble dragons or other mythical beasts, with the head and tail rising to either end of the instrument while the belly forms its body. It is most often played with a wooden hammer or beater, and is of a size to make it more suited for homes and guildhouses than travel on the road.
Gemshorn Wind The gemshorn is crafted from a long piece of animal's horn, often carved with elaborate scrollwork or in such a manner that it resembles a unicorn's horn. Rarely, it is said that gemshorns can be found that so closely remember those horns of the creature of legend that one can scarcely tell that they are not real.
Gittern String The gittern is shaped much in the manner of an elongated teardrop with a flat-faced, curving belly and a long, gently bending fretted neck. A set of twelve strings courses over a short bridge and decorative sound hole to a curving peg-box carved with an elaborate scroll.
Gremlik Magkwon Wind Dwarven A semi-conical valved brass instrument, the Gremlik Magkwon is almost always made of metal. The instrument should be worn over the shoulder when played, and features a large bell that situates above the tubist's head, projecting forward. The three piston valves are located directly in front of the musician slightly above waist-height. A gooseneck holds the mouthpiece, allowing for finer adjustment. The instrument is named Gremlik Magkwon or "Angry Mother-in-Law" due to the deep tonal pitch that the instrument provides, and for its historical use in Dwarven culture as a warning horn during battle.
Guiro Percussion The guiro is a wooden friction instrument generally carved to resemble a gourd with a series of ridges along one side. A scraping stick attached to the guiro by a leather cord produces the distinctive clacking sound by rubbing it across the ridges.
Guti'adar String The guti'adar has an elegant, triangular shape across which run its many strings. The long slender body has inconspicuous sound holes on either side of its many strings that run from the base to the gracefully curved upper arm that holds the tuning pins. It is just small enough to be played from the lap or against the chest.
Harp String The harp, designed to be portable, features a long, slender hollow base that rests against the chest when played. A riser extends from the bottom of the base to support a gracefully curved upper arm that completes the triangular shape of the instrument. The twenty-four strings of differing lengths are anchored along the center of the base and stretch upward to connect to the upper arm with small pins that allow the musician to keep the delicate instrument in tune.
Hautbois Wind The hautbois is a tube crafted from wood that tapers slightly to a flared end. A series of six or seven holes are drilled upon the front, in-between the often decoratively banded segments, with a small set of two keys placed upon the lower holes to allow a wide range of tones. A slender double reed is placed in the top of the mouthpiece, giving the hautbois its characteristic reedy tone.
Hichiriki Wind Elothean The hichiriki are in fact slender tubes, similar to that of a simplistic flute, with finger holes carved at regular intervals down its length. Traditionally crafted from bamboo, wood, or a slender reed, this Elothean instrument is one often found played by both children and adults alike due to its mellow, sweet tones and ease of play.
Horn Wind The horn is crafted from a short, curving length of horn that has been reinforced with bands of metal along the rim and tip. It is played by directing air through the smaller end.
Jug Wind While there can be little doubt the jug once held some form of strong liquor, it is unfortunately empty now. More's the pity.
kalungu Percussion Gor'Tog Also referred to as a 'talking drum', the kalungu is an hourglass-shaped drum with one side smaller -- the Kokau Waai or Little Brother and the other larger, called Itukwana Ami or Big Sister. A uniquely Toggish invention, the tensioning ropes along the drum provide a modulation of pitch when squeezed. Used historically to communicate between clans and villages, the drum is often used presently in storytelling and rituals important to Toggish clans now that present day has made travel easier.
Khurmary String The khurmary has an elegant, triangular shape across which run its many strings. The long slender body has inconspicuous sound holes on either side of its many strings that run from the base to the gracefully curved upper arm that holds the tuning pins. It is just small enough to be played from the lap or against the chest.
Kithara String The kithara is larger, though similar, to a lyre. Looking somewhat reminiscent of an ox head, the squared sound box "head" forms the base from which stretch upward in a fan-shaped array to be anchored by pegs attached to the crossbar connecting the curved "horns".
Lap Harp String The harp has an elegant, triangular shape across which run its many strings. The long slender body has inconspicuous sound holes on either side of its many strings that run from the base to the gracefully curved upper arm that holds the tuning pins. It is just small enough to be played from the lap or against the chest.
Large Harp String The harp, designed to be portable, features a long, slender hollow base that rests against the chest when played. A riser extends from the bottom of the base to support a gracefully curved upper arm that completes the triangular shape of the instrument. The twenty-four strings of differing lengths are anchored along the center of the base and stretch upward to connect to the upper arm with small pins that allow the musician to keep the delicate instrument in tune.
Lute String The lute has a tear-shaped body with deeply curved sides and back and a short neck. The six courses of strings run across a central sound hole down the fretted fingerboard to the tuning pegs affixed to a head that is bent back in a near ninety-degree angle. Its soft sound makes it an excellent accompaniment for the voice.
Lyra viol String Elves An instrument from Elven culture, the lyra viol is favored particularly by Mountain Elves. Resembling a cross between a violin and a lute, the lyra viol has a large body with a sharply concave waist to allow the player to brace it over his thigh, and a narrow neck with gut frets. While the musician holds it as one would a lute, the lyra viol is played with a bow rather than a pick. It is considered a sophisticated instrument, and is associated in literature with the court of Queen Morganae Sunderstone.
Lyre String The simply constructed lyre consists of a U-shaped body connected at the top with a slender crossbar. The four strings run from the crossbar to the bottom of the body across an open hand hole. It is played with one hand in front to strum the strings, and the other in the back to dampen the notes.
Mandolin String The pear-shaped mandolin has a round sound box of equal length with its slightly curving neck and is fitted with courses of four strings. A round sound hole, often decorated with elaborate scrollwork, is placed central in the face of the sound box just above a long bridge.
Maracas Percussion Made from hollowed gourds filled with dried seeds, these instruments make a distinctive rattling sound when shaken. While they come in many varieties, the most common and perhaps best known are the maracas.
Minjayrah Wind The pale minjayrah is a simple form of flute fashioned from a length of bamboo or reed. In more civilized cultures it is often decorated with bands of minerals or gemstones between the finger holes or notched blow hole at the end, but it is not uncommon to see a fresh minjayrah cut from a freshwater reed in more rustic locales.
Mirliton Wind The mirliton is an odd little instrument often crafted from thin wood or paper, with rice paper over the ends. When played, it produces a high, nasal sound as the paper is vibrated by air channeled over the instrument's blow hole.
Mitbiq Wind The mitbiq is a double-chambered wind instrument fashioned from two tubes of wood, reed, or bone that have each been lashed together and fitted with a small, slit reed. An array of finger holes have been placed down each of the tubes, allowing the player to evoke a wide range of reedy tones from it.
Moon shell horn Wind The horn is crafted from a large shell once inhabited by a sea creature. It is played by placing one's fingers upon a variety of small holes in one side and blowing through the end, directing the air through the spiral inside.
Naqqara The naqqara is a pair of deep, bowl-shaped drums tightly lashed together so that they can be played in tandem. The drums can be tuned by adjusting the tension of the thongs laced through the skin covering the bases.
Nehpar'i Stringed S'Kra Mur The pear-shaped nehpar'i has a round sound box of equal length with its slightly curving neck and is fitted with courses of four strings. A round sound hole, often decorated with elaborate scrollwork, is placed central in the face of the sound box just above a long bridge.
Nguru Wind Prydaen The nguru is a small wind instrument native to Prydaen culture that is traditionally made out of the large tooth of an animal but can be made out of carved wood and bone, or molded clay and is shaped like a tooth with a tapering curved end. The nguru consists of a large round opening where one exhales and a smaller opening at the curved end of the instrument, and has between two to four finger holes and is often intricately carved.
Oboe Wind The oboe is a tube crafted from wood that tapers slightly to a flared end. A series of six or seven holes are drilled upon the front, in-between the often decoratively banded segments, with a small set of two keys placed upon the lower holes to allow a wide range of tones. A slender double reed is placed in the top of the mouthpiece, giving the oboe its characteristic reedy tone.
Ocarina Wind Small and round, the ocarina bears four finger holes, while air is forced through a beveled blowhole to a sound hole just below the tip. The outer shell of the ocarina can be shaped into various whimsical designs, most often animals or foods.
Pan-pipes Wind Elves An instrument from Elven culture, the pan-pipes are favored particularly by Forest Elves. Consisting of five or more pipes or tubes of gradually increasing length, and occasionally girth, the pan-pipes are also similar to the syrinx. Unlike the syrinx, pan-pipes are traditionally set in a curved array, enabling the musician to reach all notes by a simple turn of the head. Pan-pipes are normally made of reeds, with the kokona reed and bamboo being the two most popular, however a lightweight wood can be used as well.
Physalis Wind The bladder pipe's unusual sound is due to the inability of the performer to control the reed directly. A large animal bladder, usually pig, forms a wind resevoir that forces air through the reed and down the wooden pipe. A series of six or seven holes drilled in the pipe allow the musician to produce a variety of loud, reedy tones. On some bladder pipes, a second drone pipe is added to produce a steady tone, but these are rare.
Piccolo Wind The piccolo is a half-size flute, and contains most of the same fingerings as a standard size flute but is a full octave higher on the register. Due to this, the piccolo is renown for adding spark and brilliance to any piece it lends itself to. The piccolo is often made of wood, but can also be made out of metal, glass, crystal, or ivory.
Pi sitar String The sitar has an extremely long, flat, fretted neck that joins at one end with a large, gourd-based sound box. Five strings course down the neck along finely-carved frets to an ornamental gourd resonator, meant to keep the sitar level when placed upon the ground.
Pi tambura String
Plains flute Wind You imagine it's used to play music but otherwise can't seem to recall anything of note.
Priest's rattle Percussion Made from hollowed gourds filled with dried seeds, these instruments make a distinctive rattling sound when shaken. While they come in many varieties, the most common and perhaps best known are the maracas.
Psaltery String The psaltery is a formed from a large, shallow box upon which courses of twenty-four strings have been strung width-wise over a pair of ornamentally carved sound holes. Bridges placed at seemingly irregular intervals allow one to achieve a wide variety of tones by plucking the strings to either side of them.
Pyi-pya String The tall, elongated, lute-like pyi-pya is usually crafted of wood or a similarly soft material. It is fitted with four large pegs, frets along the belly and neck, and bears courses of four silk strings.
Ramkie String Prydaen The ramkie is a traditional Prydaen string instrument made out of a very long piece of wood or bone that serves as the neck connected to a front facing hollowed out square made out of a lightweight, durable wood. Often strung with between three to four strings, some more elaborate pieces have up to six.
Rebec String The pear-shaped rebec has a small, shallow body that tapers seamlessly into its long neck. The four strings run from the tailpiece affixed to the body to the pegbox atop the neck. It has a reputation as a rustic instrument, with a strident, slightly nasal sound, yet is deceptively difficult to master.
Recorder Wind The recorder is a long, flared tube with seven finger holes and a single thumb hole. A slit for a blowhole at the tip directs the flow of air through a block just inside the top of the tube. Notes are produced by covering various holes with the fingers.
Ritual drum Percussion The drum has a shallow body with a tightly stretched skin head and a pair of strips attached to the front side to provide a handhold while playing. Colorful beads and feathers can be attached to the edge of the frame as simple decorations.
Sackbut Wind The sackbut is a wind instrument characterized by a telescopic slide with which the player varies the length of the tube to change pitches, allowing chromaticism as well as easy and accurate doubling of voices as well as a bell from which the sound emanates. The sackbut is always made of metal, but can be embellished with gems and other ornate work.
Sarangi Stringed S'Kra Mur The sarangi is a small, box-shaped instrument often crafted to resemble a variety of shapes and designs. Three gut strings run up the sarangi's length, across a bridge that is supported upon a length of stretched hide to the top where it is secured by long tuning dowels bearing knobs on either side.
Serpent Wind The serpent is a bass wind instrument with a cup shaped mouthpiece like a brass instrument, but also with side holes similar to a woodwind. So named because of the long cone is bent into a snakelike 'S' shape, the serpent is generally made of wood with walnut wood being the most popular choice, and then often being covered in leather. The serpent is known for its firm yet mellow timbre.
Shakuhachi Wind The shakuhachi is a simple form of flute fashioned from a length of bamboo or reed. In more civilized cultures it is often decorated with bands of minerals or gemstones between the finger holes or notched blow hole at the end, but it is not uncommon to see a fresh shakuhachi cut from a freshwater reed in more rustic locales.
Shaman's Drum Percussion About the size of a bodhran, the shaman's drum is a shallow wooden cylinder with cross-braces on the back, allowing the user to hold it while playing, and padded with bearskin along the sides.
Shawm Wind With a wide conical bore, the bass shawm is a wooden single-reed instrument noted for the rough nasal quality of its sound.
Shekere Percussion The shekere consists of a dried gourd with beads woven into a net covering the gourd. The shape of the gourd determines the sound of the instrument, and bead work is added, as well as color. The shekere may be twisted, shaken or slapped producing a subtle variety of effects.
Shintu Wind You recall little of the shintu, beyond the fact that it is supposed to have odd properties when used in water. Though, you're not quite sure if there is more rumor to that than truth.
Sistrum Percussion Elves An instrument that encompasses all Elven cultures and clans, the sistrum consists of a handle and U-shaped metal frame, usually made of brass or bronze as these produce the best sound conduction, but any metal is acceptable. When shaken, small rings or loops of thin metal on moveable crossbars produce a sound that ranges from a soft clank to a loud jangling. The effect produced by the sistrum in music -- when shaken in short, sharp, rhythmic pulses -- is to arouse movement and activity. Therefore, the sistrum has been traditionally used in celebration dances and other high-energy activities.
Sonajero Percussion Prydaen The sonajero is native to Prydaen culture, and almost exclusively made of wood. The sonajero consists of a handle and a partially enclosed box container several small cymbals, much like those found on a tambourine. Most sonajeros are single, meaning they only house one section of cymbals but pieces that are more elaborate are known to contain up to four.
Spoons Percussion This instrument is, in fact, a pair of spoons (or stylized, spoon-shaped pieces) made of wood or metal. Often affixed together at their bases so that the backs of their heads are almost touching, the spoons are meant to be held in the hand and slapped against another surface to produce a steady rhythm.
Sra'ajhh String S'Kra Mur The sra'ajhh has an elongated, oval-shaped body that curves slightly inward at the sides. An equally long, unfretted neck supports a set of four strings, framed by curving C-shaped sound holes, that run over a shallowly curving bridge to a short, scrollwork pegbox. Somewhat similar to the violin in design, this very much more slender cousin is also played with a curving bow, and often held against the chest while played.
Stamping stick Percussion The stamping stick consists of a spindled pole, often iron or copper, with loose rings that slide along the stick to produce sound.
Syrinx Wind The syrinx is formed from a row of hollow tubes, often crafted from wood or bone, that have been lashed together similarly to a log raft. Each of the tubes are of a different length, allowing the player to evoke a wide range of tones when air is blown over one end.
Tabla Percussion
Tabor Percussion The tabor has a cylindrical shell which is always made of wood and two skin heads tightened by rope tension. It is played by striking stick against the head. The tabor is often, but not always, suspended by a strap worn on the forearm.
Tambourine Percussion The tambourine has a round frame covered on one side with a drum skin for beating out a rhythm. The frame is also set with several pairs of metal discs, which hang loosely in evenly spaced openings to add a bit of jingle to the instrument's sound. Its size and versatile playing style makes it popular with dancers and gypsies.
Tapani Percussion The tapani is a double-sided drum often fashioned from strips of laminated wood. Slender, oversized frames supporting stretched hides adorn each end, held in place with cords or rawhide thongs. Those who play the tapani can adjust the tension (and in doing so, the tone) of the instrument by tightening their hands upon those cords.
Temple Drum Percussion The drum has a shallow body with a tightly stretched skin head and a pair of strips attached to the front side to provide a handhold while playing. Colorful beads and feathers can be attached to the edge of the frame as simple decorations.
Tenor steelpan Percussion The tenor steelpan is a chromatically pitched percussion instrument made from steel that has been stretched into a bowl shape, and then the note pattern is marked onto the surface, with notes of different shapes and sizes being used to create the pitch of the specific steelpan as well as the notes it produces. The steelpan is then played by being struck using a pair of hammers.
Treble viol String
Triangle Percussion The triangle is a bar of metal, most commonly steel, bent into a triangle shape. Held by a loop at the top, one corner of the angles is always left open which causes the instrument to have its trademark indeterminate pitch. One of the ends of the open angles is always left slightly hooked, allowing the wand with which the triangle is played to be attached by some form of fabric -- never metal.
Txistu Wind The txistu is a small and slender flute-like whistle that sports three holes on its upper side and one on its bottom. Its high-pitched sound has a delicate, haunting quality that combined with its convenient one-handed playability make it a very popular woodwind.
Viola String The viola is a bowed four-string instrument, slightly larger than a violin in size and with a much deeper sound. The viola's stately and dark timbre contrasts sharply with that of the violin, placing it in the middle of the viol family, as it is lower than the violin but pitched much higher than a violincello.
Violin String The violin is a small, oval-shaped stringed instrument made of wood with a slightly bowed back and front. Each side curves sharply inward, accented by elegant F-shaped soundboard holes to either side of a sharply curved bridge supporting four strings.
Violincello String The violincello, or cello, is a medium-sized stringed instrument made of wood with sloping shoulders and S-shaped soundboard holes. Like its cousin the Lyra Viol, it is also most commonly meant to be played with a bow from a seated position, but the skilled performer may also play it while standing.
Walking stick flute Wind The walking stick flute is formed from a length of sturdy wood that has been carved to somewhat resemble a simple side-blown flute. Metal bands can often be found on these to reinforce its length, allowing it to support the weight of a grown Gor'Tog despite its hollow length and many finger holes, as well as metal caps upon the end.
Washboard Percussion Generally carved from hard wood with corrugated tin or copper covering the front, the washboard produces its distinctive sound when sticks are scraped along the ridges. The instrument is shaped so that it can be worn and played on the chest.
Web Lyre String Elothean Born from the Eloth predilection for complexity and web-like designs, the Elothean web lyre has a rounder frame than traditional lyres and is significantly more difficult to master. Three sets of eight silk strings are strung across the instrument's body at varying angles and inclines, forming a delicate weave capable of producing sublimely intricate melodies. An Elothean web lyre requires two hands to play.
Whistle Wind The whistle is composed of a thin tube with six equidistant holes drilled down its length, topped with a carved mouthpiece.
Xylophone Percussion The small xylophone is defined by having between five and twelve bars made of either wood or metal, with each material type producing its own distinct timbre and pitch. The xylophone is a transposing instrument: its parts are written one octave below the sounding notes. Xylophones should be played with very hard mallets or hammers. Lighter tones can be created on xylophones by using wooden-headed mallets made from rosewood, ebony, birch, or other hard woods. The xylophone's frames are made of wood or steel tubing.
Yarghul Wind
Zills Percussion The zills consist of paired metal discs attached to the thumb and middle finger of each hand. They produce a bell-like tone when tapped together and are often played by dancers while they perform.
Zither String
Zurna Wind